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Indonesia

WRI established its Indonesia office in 2014. We work with leaders in business, government, and civil society to address climate change, forest restoration, forest governance, and access to information. Learn more about our work in Indonesia, including our Forests and Landscapes in Indonesia, Governance of Forests Initiative, and Access Initiative projects. Visit the WRI Indonesia website.

Eight recommended actions can improve energy efficiency in buildings to unlock a “triple win” and address economic, environmental and social challenges in world’s urban areas

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 11, 2016) — A new policy roadmap from World Resources Institute, Accelerating Building Efficiency: Eight Actions for Urban Leaders, shows how city-level leaders worldwide can overcome barriers to improving building efficiency and reduce energy demand through policy and market action. WRI finds that better energy efficiency in buildings can unlock a “triple win” of economic, environmental and social benefits for cities, and taking action now can avoid locking in decades of inefficiency.

Almo Pradana

Energy and Climate Manager

Almo serves as the Energy and Climate Manager for WRI Indonesia. He leads the development of the sustainable energy portfolio within WRI Indonesia, and is currently in charge of developing the...

Hanny Chrysolite

Forest and Climate Program Officer

Hanny is the Forest and Climate Program Officer at WRI Indonesia. She supports the research, outreach, and training activities of Indonesia forests and climate monitoring platform and policies....

Reidinar Juliane

Communications Specialist

Reidinar (Dinar) is the Communications Specialist at WRI Indonesia. She works to coordinate the communications activities at WRI Indonesia, from strategy to implementation.

Prior to...

Satrio Wicaksono

Forest and Landscape Restoration Manager, Indonesia

Satrio A. Wicaksono is the Forest and Landscape Restoration Manager at WRI-Indonesia. Working closely with the Global Restoration Initiative team based in DC, he leads WRI restoration efforts in...

New data on Global Forest Watch shows that in some of the world's most heavily forested nations, more than 90 percent of tree cover loss is happening in natural forests rather than plantations. That's a problem since natural forests, especially those in the tropics, provide much greater climate, biodiversity and water benefits over planted lands.

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