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WRI established its Indonesia office in 2014. We work with leaders in business, government, and civil society to address climate change, forest restoration, forest governance, and access to information. Learn more about our work in Indonesia, including our Forests and Landscapes in Indonesia, Governance of Forests Initiative, and Access Initiative projects.

4 Ways GIS Mapping Can Empower Forest Communities in Indonesia

GIS maps are one of the most accurate ways to share geographic data. For local communities in Indonesia, it can be an invaluable tool to stake out traditional boundaries and resolve land conflicts with governments.

WRI's Forest and Landscapes in Indonesia project reveals four ways GIS mapping can empower forest communities in Indonesia.

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Cultivating Accountability in REDD+

As the struggle continues to protect forests around the world, REDD+ implementers should look to cultivate and strengthen institutions and mechanisms of accountability.

Though REDD+ includes an international accountability mechanism, case studies in Brazil and Indonesia, where civil society participated in and challenged land-use decisions, demonstrate that this will probably be insufficient for achieving REDD+ goals.

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Preventing Forest Fires in Indonesia: Focus on Riau Province, Peatland, and Illegal Burning

Stopping recurring fires and protecting Indonesia’s communities, businesses, and forests requires a proactive plan to prevent future fires, or at least greatly reduce their intensity.

As part of our ongoing Indonesia forest fires series, WRI’s researchers have used data from the Global Forest Watch platform along with preliminary on-the-ground research to analyze Indonesia’s forest fires and haze problem.

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Using Accountability

Why REDD+ Needs To Be More Than An Economic Incentive

This issue brief explores the complicated realities of how accountability tools functioned in land-use planning, zoning, and permitting processes in a pair of case studies from Brazil and Indonesia and draws lessons for government or civil society designers of REDD+ programs.

One case...

Struggles in East Kalimantan Underscore Need for Better Access to Environmental Information

More than 70 percent of Samarinda’s land (the capital of Indonesia’s East Kalimantan province) is allocated to mining concessions, and little information is provided to citizens on companies’ compliance to safety and environmental health rules.

In the hopes of preventing mining fatalities, the Mining Advocacy Network (JATAM), a group of Indonesian NGOs and community organizations, requested information from the Indonesian government to determine what companies were doing to mitigate mines’ environmental and health impacts. This process prompted the STRIPE project, which will focus on building strong civil society coalitions to advocate for corporate disclosure of information.

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Kebakaran Hutan di Indonesia Mencapai Tingkat Tertinggi Sejak Kondisi Darurat Kabut Asap Juni 2013

Di awal Maret 2014, kebakaran hutan dan lahan gambut di provinsi Riau, Sumatera, Indonesia, melonjak hingga titik yang tidak pernah ditemukan sejak krisis kabut asap Asia Tenggara pada Juni 2013. Hampir 50.000 orang mengalami masalah pernapasan akibat kabut asap tersebut, menurut Badan Penanggulangan Bencana Indonesia. Citra-citra satelit dengan cukup dramatis menggambarkan banyaknya asap polutan yang dilepaskan ke atmosfer, yang juga berkontribusi kepada perubahan iklim.

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Fires in Indonesia Spike to Highest Levels Since June 2013 Haze Emergency

In Indonesia, dramatic satellite images of heavy smoke plumes show the large amount of pollutants being discharged to the atmosphere. The fires are extensive in areas with deep peat soils, suggesting high volumes of carbon are being released, contributing to climate change.

Global Forest Watch shows that some of the largest fires are on fully developed plantations, despite the fact that many of these companies are committed to eliminating fire in their management practices. The persistence of the fires—and the intensity with which they have returned—raises important questions.

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Kebakaran Hutan Indonesia Membawa Lebih Banyak Asap ke Asia Tenggara

Kebakaran terakhir di Indonesia kemungkinan besar berakar dari pembukaan lahan untuk pertanian, perkebunan, dan produksi kayu. Menurut data dari [Global Forest Watch] (http://www.globalforestwatch.org/)-sistem online baru yang melacak perubahan tutupan pohon, dan informasi lainnya secara nyaris seketika ** setengah dari peringatan titik api terjadi di lahan yang dikelola oleh perusahaan kelapa sawit, kayu, dan pulpwood**-meskipun secara hukum masyarakat dan perusahaan dilarang menggunakan api untuk membuka lahan.

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Indonesian Fires Bring More Haze to Southeast Asia

Clearing land for timber and agriculture is likely to blame for Indonesia's latest bout of fires. According to data from Global Forest Watch—a new online system that tracks tree cover change, fires, and other information in near-real time—roughly half of these fires are burning on land managed by oil palm, timber, and logging companies—despite the fact that using fire to clear land is illegal in Indonesia.

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