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Bonn, Germany (March 21, 2015)– Since 2011, countries participating in the Bonn Challenge have restored more than 60 million hectares of forests and landscapes and are on track to meet an ambitious global restoration goal of 150 million hectares by 2020. Environment ministers from around the world marked the significant progress at the second international Bonn Challenge conference in Germany on March 20 – 21.

The European Union issued its official proposed national climate action commitment, known as its “intended nationally determined contribution” (INDC) to the forthcoming global climate agreement. The EU set a binding, economy-wide reduction target of at least 40% reductions in its domestic emissions by 2030 compared to 1990 levels, as well as a call for a regular review and strengthening of mitigation commitments consistent with a long-term goal to curb emissions.

Today the European Commission released a strategic policy document that describes the EU’s views on what the Paris climate agreement should look like and provides a first glimpse at what the EU will likely include in its “intended nationally determined contribution” (INDC) to the forthcoming global pact.

This week, international climate negotiators gathered in Geneva, Switzerland for the first in a series of negotiating sessions to establish an international climate agreement in Paris at the end of 2015.

Following is a statement from Jennifer Morgan, Global Director, Climate Program, World Resources Institute:

Today European Union leaders agreed on a climate and energy package that sets a domestic carbon reduction target of “at least” 40% by 2030.

Following is a statement by Jennifer Morgan, Director, Climate and Energy Programs, World Resources Institute:

Tougher Greenhouse Goals Could Cut EU’s Gas Imports in Half

Later this week, the European Council will decide on a target to further reduce the EU’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2030.

At issue is whether the Council will decide to reduce emissions by “at least 40 percent” from 1990 levels—leaving the door open to increase ambition in negotiation with other countries—or cap reductions at just 40 percent, locking in a lower goal and possibly influencing other countries to do the same.

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