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WRI established its China office in 2007. We work with leaders in business, government, and civil society to address climate change, transport, and water risk issues. Learn more about our work in China. Visit the WRI China website.

The restoration of China's Loess Plateau is unmatched in scale, yet the allure of non-native species to engineer a desired outcome in the landscape is common globally.

With changing climate and increasing populations, we need to restore landscapes to ensure the resilience of ecosystem services in the 21st century recognizing that cultural diversity is as important as biodiversity in restoration decisions.

In fast-urbanizing China, nearly 90 percent of coastal cities face some degree of water scarcity and roughly 300 million rural residents lack access to clean water.

To quench the country’s chronic thirst, the Chinese government has turned to desalination, aiming to produce as much as 3 million cubic meters of desalinated water daily by 2020, up from today’s 0.77 million cubic meter.

Imagine that we have the chance to cut greenhouse gas emissions, boost household incomes and increase crop yields, while making vulnerable areas more resilient to severe weather and improving the lives of people in some of the world’s poorest regions.

The fact is, we could do all this and more by restoring the world’s degraded landscapes to productive, sustainable use.

With China at an economic and environmental crossroad, ongoing cooperation on climate and clean energy with the U.S. can yield significant social and economic rewards for both countries. The benefits of this course can and must go together to tackle climate change and create vibrant economies for the 21st century.

WASHINGTON (November 12, 2014)— During a presidential trip to China for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping made major climate change announcements. President Obama announced a target to cut greenhouse gas emissions between 26 to 28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025. President Xi announced targets to peak carbon dioxide emissions around 2030 and to increase the share of non-fossil fuel energy to around 20 percent by 2030.

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