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Blog Posts: power plants

  • 7 Charts Explain Changing U.S. Power Sector Emissions

    Where do U.S. power sector emissions come from? And how have they changed over time?

    Today, WRI released an update of its U.S. state GHG emissions data via CAIT 2.0, our climate data explorer. These and other data provide valuable context in light of the EPA's newly proposed emissions standards for U.S. power plants.

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  • Former Republican EPA Administrators Show that Climate Change Need Not Be Partisan

    U.S. climate action received support yesterday from four former EPA administrators who served Republican presidents. William D. Ruckelshaus, Lee M. Thomas, William K. Reilly, and Christine Todd Whitman testified before the Senate’s Environment and Public Works Committee at a hearing entitled “Climate Change: The Need to Act Now.”

    They delivered a clear message for Congress: Climate change is one of the greatest threats to America’s economy, environment, and communities—and it need not be a partisan issue.

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  • EPA’s New Clean Power Plan Is Both Achievable and Economically Beneficial

    The EPA's proposed rule to cut carbon pollution from power plants is a critical step in avoiding the worst consequences of global warming. Without significant reductions from the power sector—America’s largest source of greenhouse gas emissions—the country cannot meet its goal of reducing its emissions 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2020. EPA’s proposal provides a flexible framework that puts those reductions within reach.

    Here’s a look at how the proposed rule would impact states and the future of U.S. climate action.

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  • 3 Reasons Why Cutting Carbon From Power Plants Is Good For Business

    To this day, carbon pollution—the main driver of climate change—has not been controlled from power plants.

    That’s why the U.S. EPA’s new rules are so momentous, putting federal limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants for the first time. With the power sector representing a third of America’s carbon footprint, these rules are the biggest single action the administration can take to drive down greenhouse gases.

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  • Cutting Carbon: States Can Use What they’ve Already Got to Whittle Power Plant Emissions

    As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency prepares to release greenhouse gas standards for existing power plants on June 2, state officials are weighing options on the best ways to cut carbon dioxide emissions.

    We have shown how some states may be able to comply with these standards.

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  • 5 Ways Arkansas Can Reduce Power Plant Emissions

    Arkansas has already taken steps to reduce its near-term power sector CO2 emissions by implementing energy efficiency policies. And the state has the opportunity to go even further. In fact, new WRI analysis finds that Arkansas can reduce its CO2 emissions 39 percent below 2011 levels by 2020 by implementing new clean energy strategies and taking advantage of existing infrastructure. Achieving these reductions will allow Arkansas to meet moderately ambitious EPA power plant emissions standards, which are due to be finalized in 2015.

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  • National Climate Assessment Reveals How Climate Change Impacts Your Neighborhood

    The National Climate Assessment, released today, is the most comprehensive assessment of U.S. climate impacts to date.

    Here’s a look at how communities across the country are already being affected—as well as steps we can take at the local, state, and federal levels to rein in future warming.

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  • After State of the Union Address, U.S. Should Pursue Ambitious Power Plant Emissions Standards

    In the State of the Union address last night, President Obama called to make this “a year of action.” Addressing climate change will require his administration to make that call a reality.

    The most important task the administration can take is to set greenhouse gas emissions standards for existing power plants—a move that the President highlighted in his speech last night. Ambitious power plant standards are a critical starting point if the United States is to rise to the climate change challenge.

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  • Watching for Signs of Climate Action in the State of the Union Address

    When President Obama addresses the nation later today, climate change is expected to be featured. The president recently said that one of his personal passions is “leaving a planet that is as spectacular as the one we inherited from our parents and our grandparents.” The next two years will determine if his administration can meet this standard.

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