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Blog Posts: united states

  • 7 Charts Explain Changing U.S. Power Sector Emissions

    Where do U.S. power sector emissions come from? And how have they changed over time?

    Today, WRI released an update of its U.S. state GHG emissions data via CAIT 2.0, our climate data explorer. These and other data provide valuable context in light of the EPA's newly proposed emissions standards for U.S. power plants.

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  • High Water Stress Jeopardizes One-Third of World’s Corn Crop

    According to a new report, the $65 billion U.S. corn industry faces a range of water-related risks that could disrupt production. Other countries face similar threats. In fact, one-third of the world’s corn production occurs in highly or extremely highly water-stressed regions.

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  • Getting More from the U.S. Farm Conservation Water Quality Budget

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture could potentially spend part of its budget for water quality improvements seven to 12 times more cost effectively than it does now. A new WRI analysis shows how, explains why USDA isn’t already doing so, and proposes ways to make a complex policy a reality.

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  • Overcoming Barriers to USDA’s New Conservation Program

    For more than 30 years, the USDA has worked to reduce water pollution by offering farmers throughout the nation financial and technical help to put conservation measures in place. While these efforts have successfully addressed environmental problems at the individual farm level—such as soil erosion—agriculture remains a key source of water pollution.

    However, it’s only a small portion of farms that generate the majority of agriculture’s contribution to U.S. water pollution. New research shows that targeting conservation funds to these farms with the most potential to reduce pollution could be up to 12 times more cost effective than the usual practice of disbursing funds widely. And encouragingly, a new USDA program aims to capitalize on a similar targeted approach.

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  • 3 Reasons Why Cutting Carbon From Power Plants Is Good For Business

    To this day, carbon pollution—the main driver of climate change—has not been controlled from power plants.

    That’s why the U.S. EPA’s new rules are so momentous, putting federal limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants for the first time. With the power sector representing a third of America’s carbon footprint, these rules are the biggest single action the administration can take to drive down greenhouse gases.

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  • 5 Essential Facts About Emissions Standards for Power Plants

    On June 2, President Obama will unveil the latest—and likely greatest—emissions reduction policy since he announced his Climate Action Plan last year: new rules to limit carbon dioxide pollution from existing power plants. With power plants accounting for around one-third of U.S. emissions, these rules will address the country’s single-largest source of greenhouse gas pollution.

    Unfortunately, there are a lot of misconceptions on what these standards are designed to achieve, the impact they will have, and why they’re so important. This blog highlights some of the most important aspects of these crucial actions.

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  • Power Plant Rules Are Critical for Curbing U.S. Emissions

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will soon unveil its first-ever emissions standards for existing power plants. These rules represent the most significant component of the U.S. Climate Action Plan—and moreover, they’re an essential step for overcoming the climate change challenge.

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  • Cutting Carbon: States Can Use What they’ve Already Got to Whittle Power Plant Emissions

    As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency prepares to release greenhouse gas standards for existing power plants on June 2, state officials are weighing options on the best ways to cut carbon dioxide emissions.

    We have shown how some states may be able to comply with these standards.

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  • Florida Already Feeling Effects of Climate Change

    In an article originally published in Tampa Bay Times, Lee Thomas discusses the effects of climate change in Florida, and the need for state-level action.

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  • Snapshots of Miami Sea Level Rise

    Miami ranks as the most vulnerable city in the world to the risk of coastal flooding caused by sea level rise.

    Despite Miami’s vulnerability to sea level rise, there is reason to be hopeful: Many of the city’s local leaders and community residents are emerging as innovators in local climate action.

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