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WASHINGTON (August 22, 2016)—The 2016 G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China is just around the corner, September 4-5, and will be the first G20 Summit since the Paris Agreement was reached last December. Many are looking to the G20 for a clear signal from world leaders that the message of Paris was received, and that member countries are putting climate and clean energy action at the heart of their growth agendas.

A climate change strategy for all of North America could transform how we address a defining issue of our time. The move would be unprecedented, but it is more possible than ever. Heads of state from Canada, Mexico and the United States have the opportunity at the North American Leadership Summit in Ottawa to begin the process by setting out strong continent-wide climate actions.

WASHINGTON (MAY 12, 2016)— The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency finalized the first-ever federal standards for methane emissions from new and modified sources in the oil and natural gas sectors. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas pollutant, with up to 34 times more global warming potential than carbon dioxide, and it accounts for roughly one-quarter of human-made global warming. Methane valued at more than $1 billion escapes from oil and natural gas extraction processes in the U.S.

While a carbon tax has attracted little attention in the U.S. media before the primary debate last week, WRI research shows it's a policy that can reduce emissions in cost-effective, pro-growth and equitable ways. In fact, some 40 countries and more than 20 cities, states and regions have or are planning on putting carbon prices in place.

Since 195 countries adopted the Paris Agreement in December 2015, many countries are starting to implement their climate commitments or “nationally determined contribution” (NDC). But many developing countries lack the tools to measure, report and verify progress on their climate commitments and actions. The Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (ICAT) was launched today in response to calls for support from countries for improved transparency and capacity building related to the Paris Agreement.

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The Paris Agreement on climate change is anchored in plans – known as Intended National Determined Contributions, or INDCs -- to cut greenhouse gas emissions submitted by individual countries. As countries put policies in place to fulfill their INDCs, the Agreement also lays out requirements to regularly monitor implementation and progress. Performance...

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